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Google Assistant - How-To Talk Digital Marketing, Ecommerce, SEO, SEM & Web Analytics - Mandile Marketing – SEO & Conversion Optimization Colorado Springs.

How-To Talk Digital Marketing, Ecommerce, SEO, SEM & Web Analytics

Category:Internet Marketing Service in Colorado Springs Tags : 

Ecommerce, SEO, SEM & Web Analytics

I. Digital Marketing

. Analytics or Web Analytics Tools > The analysis of data generated by people’s activity on websites or mobile apps, for the purpose of discovering ways to improve websites and marketing campaigns.
E.g. “I’m using web analytics tools to come up with ideas to redesign my website.”

. App (Application) > A program designed to run on smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices.
E.g. “My house needs painting, so I used a local app to find a reputable service near me.”

. Banner Ad > A form of advert found on web pages and mobile applications, usually in image format.
E.g. “I’m using banner ads to bring new customers to my website.”

. Blog > A regularly updated website written by an individual, typically in a conversational style, and focused on a specific subject.

. Browser > A computer program used to navigate the Internet on computers, tablets and smartphones. Examples include Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari.
E.g. “I’m not sure why my website looks different depending on the browser a person is using.”

. Clickthrough Rate (CTR) > The number of times people click on an item of interest, like an advert, in comparison to the number of times users are exposed to that item.
E.g. “My clickthrough rate on ads about external painting is 2%, but my CTR on ads about indoor murals is less than 1%.”

. Content > The digital material available to users, via text, video, audio, images, etc.
E.g. “I’m adding more image and video content to my site, so it’ll be more engaging.”

. Conversion or Goal > The action you want visitors to perform. Examples include ecommerce purchases, form submissions, phone calls, and video views.
E.g. “My main goal is for people to book a consultation on my website, but signing up for my email newsletter would also be a conversion.”

. Conversion Optimization > The process of increasing the percentage of visitors who complete your goals.
E.g. “Once I add a new line of faux finishes to my website, I’m going to start focusing on conversion optimization.”

. Conversion Rate > The ratio of conversions to visits, often used to measure digital performance.
E.g. “I’m not sure why, but my conversion rate on external painting is very low for male visitors.”

. Cost per Click > The amount of money required to produce a single click on a digital advertisement.
E.g. “Cost per click prices seem to be higher during weekends, so I’m only running my campaigns during the week.”

. Crawler or Spider > A program designed to systematically browse content on the Internet and collect information about it to help searchers find what they’re looking for.
E.g. “I’m scared of spiders, but not the ones that help my website appear in search engines.”

. Desktop > A non-mobile device like a personal computer or laptop computer.
E.g. “I prefer to use a desktop computer at home, but when I travel I use my tablet.”

. E-commerce > The sale of products and services online.

. Email Marketing > The process of using email messages to share information and promote products and services.

. Homepage > The introductory or “main” page of a website.
E.g. “On my homepage, visitors can see examples of my most beautifully painted houses.”

. HTML > Hypertext Markup Language. A language used by web developers to create websites.
E.g. “My website was written using HTML.”

. Impressions > The number of times an advert is displayed.
E.g. “My new marketing campaign for kitchen painting has received thousands of impressions, but I’m not sure if I’ve booked any sales yet.”

. Index > A searchable catalogue of web pages and digital content used by a search engine to provide relevant results.
E.g. “Before my site appeared in the search engine’s index, people couldn’t find my website when they searched for foyer murals.”

. Keyword – A word or a phrase typed into a search engine, which businesses can target as part of their advertising campaigns.

. Landing Page > The first page on a website that a person usually sees—not necessarily the home page of that website.
E.g. “I’m adding a coupon to my landing page so that my website visitors will be encouraged to buy.”

. Link > A text or image that provides a link from one web page or website to another.
E.g. “When a major home decor blog linked to my website, I got a lot more visitors.”

. Mobile Device > A portable device, such as a smartphone or tablet, capable of connecting to the Internet and running applications.
E.g. “Grandma got a tablet and a smartphone for her birthday, so now she’s using mobile devices just like her grandkids.”

. Natural Listings or Organic Listings > Results from a search engine that are not paid adverts.
E.g. “The higher my website ranks in a search engine’s natural listings, the more website traffic I’ll get.”

. Paid Listings > Advertisements that appear on search engines results pages.
E.g. “I’m thinking about paying to have my website appear in the paid listings, so that I can bring more customers to my website.”

. Pay-Per-Click (PPC) – An advertising system in which advertisers pay for users to click on their advertisements.
E.g. “I’m going to use pay-per-click adverts to promote my new faux finishes.”

. Query or Search Term > The keyword or phrase a user types into a search engine in order to find what they’re looking for.
E.g. “When people use the search term ‘hairdresser’ they might be looking for tips on how to do it themselves or a service to do it for them.”

. Ranking > A listing’s position on a search engine results page.
E.g. “With a lot of work, I’m hoping to get my website to the #1 ranking on search engines.”

. Search Engine > A tool that indexes and returns relevant digital content in response to users’ keywords. Popular Internet search engines include Google, Bing, Yahoo, DuckDuckGo, Baidu, Yandex and more.
E.g. “I use search engines to look for trends in home decor.”

. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) > The practice of making changes to web pages, content, and the promotion of that content to improve visibility in the organic—or unpaid—search engine results.
E.g. “Investing in SEO helped my website get a higher ranking in search engine results.”

. Search Engine Marketing (SEM) > A form of advertising that allows you to bid for your advertisement to show along with search results for keywords that people are typing in. This lets businesses be seen by people at the very moment they’re searching for the things a business offers.
E.g. “SEO is a long process, but using SEM helped me get a lot more website traffic really quickly.”

. Search Engine Results Page (SERP) > A list of results appearing in a search engine in response to a user’s search query.
E.g. “After I searched for ‘buy high-gloss paint in bulk’ I noticed that the SERP had both natural listings and paid listings.”

. Session or Visit – A group of interactions that take place on your website within a given time frame. For example a single session can contain multiple page views and e-commerce transactions.
E.g. “My website got 2,000 visits last month, but what I really care about is whether those visits resulted in sales.”

. Social Media > Content such as text, images, or videos, created by individuals and shared across the Internet.
E.g. “Social media changes all the time, so I hired my niece to help me create a social media strategy.”

. Social Network > A community of individuals creating and sharing content.
E.g. “Social networks could be a good place for me to showcase my beautiful foyer murals and maybe get new customers.”

. Traffic Acquisition > The process of attracting visitors – often referred to as traffic – to websites, mobile apps and other digital assets.
E.g. “My acquisition strategy focuses on targeting people who have recently bought old houses.”

. Unique Visitor > A single visitor to a website during a specific period of time.
E.g. “No matter how many times Uncle Bob visits my website, he’s still just one unique visitor.”

. URL or Uniform Resource Locator > The unique address of a page or piece of digital content on the Internet.
E.g. “Aunt Sue, you can access my website by typing the URL into your browser.”

II. Ecommerce Jargon Buster

. Anonymous checkout > A checkout process where a user
completes the transaction without creating an account on the
seller’s website.

. Average order value (AOV) > The average amount spent per
customer order. Often used as a performance metric.
E.g. “As a business owner, looking at the average order value is a great metric to gauge annual revenue growth.”

. Category > In ecommerce, products are often grouped into a hierarchy of categories and subcategories.
E.g. “Our bespoke furniture ecommerce store is organized using categories like bedroom, living room and home office. Subcategories include type of wood finish.”

. Checkout > The process of providing information to complete an ecommerce purchase. Steps typically include billing information, shipping information, order verification and order confirmation.
E.g. “Best practices in ecommerce require having a user-friendly and smooth checkout process.”

. Conversion > A tracked, successful action that website visitors complete.

. Conversion rate > The ratio of conversions to visits, often used to measure digital performance. For example, if you have received 200 clicks and 5 conversions, your conversion rate is 2.5%.
E.g. “I improved my conversion rate by including the words ‘freeconsultation’ – a lot more people sign up now.”

Coupon code/ discount code > A special code a customer may
enter during checkout to apply a discount.

. Drop-ship > A method of fulfilling orders where a retailer has items shipped directly from the manufacturer or supplier to the customer.

. Ecommerce > The commercial trade of products and services over the internet.

. Ecommerce platform > A software program or application that lets businesses sell online. Features of ecommerce platforms vary but they generally include product information, customer account management, shopping cart and checkout processes, product search capabilities and order management.

. Fulfillment > The process of completing and delivering purchased products or services to the customer.
E.g. “Every online seller has to consider the most cost-effective method for fulfillment.”

Inventory > A complete list of a seller’s current stock.

Merchandising > The placement and display of products toentice a customer to make a purchase. Examples include ‘featured item’ lists, specific product promotions, and recommendations of top sellers or related products.

. Merchant account > An account a retailer holds with an institution such as a bank or payment gateway provider. The account is defined by a contractual agreement that allows the seller to accept credit cards or other common types of payment on an ecommerce website.

. Order confirmation > The final step of the checkout process, where a customer is informed that their order has been placed successfully. This message is usually delivered on screen and by email.

. Payment gateway > A service provider that authorizes online payments.

E.g. “Payment gateways allow customers to make purchases with bank or credit cards with the simple push of a button.”

. Privacy policy > A statement that explains what customer information an online retailer will collect and how the retailer might use that information.
E.g. “Our company’s privacy policy reassures customers that we only collect minimal information and we never sell email addresses to third parties.”

. Product feed > A file that contains a list of product inventory and product details. This file can be made available to other services in order to promote the products contained in the feed.

E.g. “We uploaded our company’s product feed into a search engine’s merchant database so our products would show up when they match a search.”

. Product recommendation engine > Software that suggests specific products to customers on a website, based on available information.
E.g. “The product recommendation engine on our bespoke furniture site suggests matching chairs for every table and desk.”

. Registration > The process of creating a customer account with an online retailer. The account holds personal information such as name, billing and shipping address, and payment details.

. Return policy > A statement that explains when, how and under what conditions a customer may return products purchased from the retailer.
E.g. “Our return policy, linked at the bottom of our website, explains that bespoke furniture cannot be refunded unless faulty.”

. SSL certificate > An SSL certificate is a file that is installed on a web server to encrypt sensitive information that is being transmitted – for example credit card details entered on a website. It also assures customers that a site is using a trusted and secure connection. Retailers can purchase an SSL certificate through a certificate authority.

.Shipping > The sending of purchased products to a consumer. Shipping may also refer to the additional fees charged by the retailer to cover the cost of delivery.
E.g. “During the checkout process, shipping is calculated based on the total weight of the furniture being purchased.”

. Shopping cart > The functionality functionality of an online store that lets visitors add multiple products to a single order.
E.g. “Having a shopping cart on your site is essential to allow users to browse and buy multiple items.”

. Stock keeping unit (SKU) > A unique identifier given to individual products to track inventory and differentiate between items for sale.
E.g. “Using SKUs has helped our business keep track of what stock we have in what location, so we can optimize inventory management.”

. Tax > In ecommerce, this refers to the total taxes that must be collected per local laws and policies as part of an online order.

III. Search Engine

. Actual cost per click (CPC) > Your actual cost-per-click (actual CPC) is the final amount you’re charged for a click on your advert. You’re often charged less – sometimes much less – than your maximum cost-per-click (max. CPC) bid.
E.g. “I’m willing to bid as high as $1.75 for my wedding photos ad, but luckily my actual CPC is only $1.60.”

. Advert (Ad) > A sponsored result that appears on a search engine results page (SERP). Ads are usually a few lines of text, and may include additional elements like a street address, reviews and phone numbers.

. Ad rank > A value that’s used to determine an ad’s position in search results. Ad rank is calculated using your bid amount, the quality score (including expected clickthrough rate, ad relevance, and landing page experience), and the expected impact of extensions and other ad formats.
E.g. “Improving my advert’s relevance and increasing my bid helped me improve my ad rank.”

. Average ad position > The position or placement of your ad on the search engine results page (SERP). Search engines typically denote the highest position as ‘Position 1’. If your ad appears half the time in Position 1 and half the time in Position 2, your average ad position would be 1.5.
E.g. “My average ad position for my pet photos ad improved from 7 to 3—I’m thrilled!”

. Clickthrough rate (CTR) > The number of times people click an item in comparison to the number of times people see that item. For example, if your ad received 100 impressions and 3 clicks, your CTR is 3%. CTR can be used to gauge how well your keywords and ads are performing. While there are no specific guidelines, you should always be working toward improving CTR.
E.g. “I improved my CTR quite a bit when I added pricing info to my wedding photos ad – that clearly made more people want to click through.”

. Conversion rate > The ratio of conversions to visits, often used to measure digital performance. For example, if you have received 200 clicks and 5 conversions, your conversion rate is 2.5%.
E.g. “I improved my conversion rate by including the words ‘free consultation’ – a lot more people sign up now.”

. Cost-per-click (CPC) > The amount of money required to produce a single click on a digital advertisement.
E.g. “I pay a much higher cost per click on my wedding photos ad because there is more competition in that field.”

. Cost-per-conversion/Cost-per-acquisition (CPA) > The amount of money spent on advertising divided by the number of conversions gained from those adverts. Also refers to the pricing model where an advertiser pays for each specified acquisition – e.g. an impression, click, opt-in or sale.

. Goals/conversions > The total number of tracked, successful actions that website visitors complete.
E.g. “Once I started tracking conversions on my guest house website, I could see how manvisitors registered for a room online and subscribed to my newsletter.”

. Impression > A measure of the number of times an ad is shown – it doesn’t necessarily meansomeone clicked on it.
E.g. “I’m getting a lot of impressions on my baby photos ad, but not many people are clicking – I may need to rewrite it.”

. Keyword > A word or a phrase typed into a search engine, which businesses can target as part of their advertising campaigns.

. Landing page > The first page that a person sees when they reach your website – not necessarily the home page.
E.g. “I’m adding a coupon to my landing page so that my website visitors will be encouraged to buy.”

Maximum bid/Maximum CPC – The highest amount that you are willing to pay for one click on your ad.
E.g. “I’ll bid as high as $2.25, but that’s my maximum bid – I’m not made of money!”

. Organic listings > Results from a search engine query that are not paid adverts.
E.g. “I’m planning to hire a search engine optimization expert tohelp me improve my spot in organic listings someday, but for now investing in the paid listings has been a big success.”

. Pay-per-click (PPC) > An advertising model where advertisers pay when people click on their advert.
E.g. “I love the PPC model—I only pay when someone clicks on my ad!”

. Quality score > A variable, measured from 1 to 10, which is used to determine the order in which ads are listed on a SERP. Improving your quality score, by making your ads more relevant to the keywords you’re bidding on, can help you achieve better ad positions and lower prices for clicks.

. Query/search term > The word or phrase that a person types into a search engine in order to find what they’re looking for.
E.g. “When people use the search term ‘hairdresser’ they might be looking for tips on how to do it themselves or a service to do it for them.”

Search engine marketing (SEM) > A form of advertising that allows you to bid for your advertisement to show alongside search results for keywords.
E.g. “SEO is a long process, but using SEM helped me get a lot more website traffic really quickly.”

Search engine results page (SERP) > A list of results appearing in a search engine in response to a person’s search query. SERPs contain organic results as well as ads.
E.g. “My goal is to be on the SERP page when anyone searches for ‘wedding photographer Cardiff’.”

IV. Search Engine Optimization

. Algorithm > A set of rules used by computers to solve problems. Search engines use algorithms to determine the rankings on a search results page.

. ALT text > A word or phrase that describes the content of an image. This is displayed if an image is not loaded, and it also helps search engines to index a page.
E.g. “The homepage of my website features an image of a fruit and vegetable garden. I included ALT text ‘fruit and vegetables’ to describe it.”

Anchor text > The clickable text that forms part of a hyperlink.
For example, if clicking ‘Photo gallery’ on a webpage takes you to ‘www.mywebsite.com/images’, then ‘photo gallery’ is the anchor text.

. Black hat > Manipulative or deceptive SEO tactics that optimize websites for search engines, not for people.
E.g. “I was especially careful to avoid any black hat SEO techniques; I didn’t want to hurt the ranking of my website in search engines.”

. Bot, crawler or spider > A program that browses and indexes content on the internet. This data is then used to help search engines deliver relevant search results.
E.g. “When I launched my website, I made sure that the pages were visible to search engine bots, so they could index my pages.”

. Destination page > The page being linked to from another page.
E.g. “If you click the link to ‘Gallery’, you’ll see a destination page full of images of our fruits and vegetables.”

. Internal links > Links from one page to another page within the same website.

. Meta description > A snippet of text in a web page’s code that describes the content of the page, and is used as the website’s description in a search engine results page.
E.g. “I write meta descriptions for each page of my website in case the search engine displays the page in the search results.”

. Meta keywords > A short list of words that describe the content of a webpage. These aren’t used by search engines.

. Ranking > A listing’s position on a search engine results page.

. Search engine optimization (SEO) > The practice of making changes to web pages, content, and the promotion of that content, to improve visibility in organic – or unpaid – search engine results.
E.g. “Investing in SEO helped my website get a higher ranking in search engine results.”

. Search engine results page (SERP) > A list of results appearing in a search engine in response to a person’s search query. SERPs contain organic results as well as ads.

. Title element > The title of a web page as indicated in the HTML. Also often used as the title of your page in a search engine results page.
E.g. “I pay careful attention to the title element of my web pages, to help search engines understand what the pages are about.”

. Web spam or spam > Techniques that are used by somewebsites to try and cheat their way to the top of search results, for example repeating keywords and paying other sites to link to yours. This is considered bad practice because truly relevant websites get buried in the results.
E.g. “I received email offers to rank first in Google search results but have turned them down because the techniques used are spam.”

. White hat > Tactics that optimize web pages for people, not for search engines. This is done by following best practices for creating good content and increasing search visibility.
E.g. “I only use white hat tactics to help search engines find my website.”

. XML sitemap > A list of all the web pages that make up your site. This helps search engines to understand your website.
E.g. “Adding a sitemap helped search engines understand the pages on my website.”

V. Web Analytics jargon buster

. Cookie > A file used by many web analytics tools to keep track of a user’s activity on a website. If a person clears their cookies or uses a different web browser, web analytics tools will see them as a different user.
E.g. “If cookies are enabled on her computer, your web analytics tool should be able to track how much time she spent on the Football Fanatic page.”

. Dimension > An attribute of a user or a session.
E.g. “I look at dimensions like ‘browser’, ‘region’ and ‘landing page’ to get a better understanding of who is interested in my King Arthur room.” (See ‘Common dimensions’ section)

. Metric > A measure of something, by quantity.
E.g. “I look at metrics like bounce rate, pages-per-visit and conversion rate to see how my guest house website is doing.” (see ‘Common metrics’ section)

. Pageview > A metric recorded each time a web page is loaded in a user’s browser.
E.g. “On average, every visit to my website has 20 pageviews. People seem to enjoy the page about my Football Fanatics room, which gets about 40% of the pageviews.”

. Session > A set of website interactions recorded for a user during a given time period. One session could be made up of several page views or downloads.
E.g. “There were 2,000 sessions on my website last month.”

. User > A person who visits your website or mobile app (some-
times referred to as a ‘visitor’).There are two types of users:

• New users – A person who has not visited your website before
• Return users – A person who has visited your website before

. Web analytics > The collection and analysis of data generated by user activity on websites or mobile apps. It helps with identifying ways to improve websites and marketing campaigns.
E.g. “I’m using web analytics tools to find out which room is more popular on my guest house website: King Arthur or Modern Romance.”

Common metrics

. Average session duration > The average length of a visit to a website, measured in minutes and seconds. In general, the longer the session, the more interested the visitor is.
E.g. “Ever since I launched video tours of all my rooms, my website’s average session duration went from 2 minutes to 8 minutes and 32 seconds!”

. Bounce rate > The percentage of visitors who navigate away from your site after viewing only one page.
E.g. “I added a welcome video to my site, but people seem toleave after a few seconds —the bounce rate is high. I guess they prefer my video room tours.”

. Conversion rate > The ratio of conversions to visits. In general, a higher conversion rate means greater success.
E.g. “After some website improvements, I was pleased to see that the conversion rate for my Modern Romance room jumped from 1% to 5%.”

. Goals/Conversions > The total number of tracked, successful actions that website visitors complete.
E.g. “Once I started tracking conversions on my guest house website, I could see how many visitors registered for a room online and subscribed to my newsletter.”

. Pages per session > The average number of pages viewed in a visit (also known as page depth). In general, the higher the number, the more engaged visitors are.
E.g. “Launching a guest testimonial page has really increased visitor engagement. My website’s average number of pages per session went from 3 to 12!”

. Pageviews > The total number of pages that users viewed on your website. This is sometimes referred to as ‘screenviews’ for mobile apps.
E.g. “There were 5,000 sessions on my website last month and 20,000 pageviews.”

. Revenue > The value of sales processed through an online shopping basket.
E.g. “If revenue from my Football Fanatic room continues atthis pace, I could retire by the time I’m 97.”

. Sessions/Visits > The total number of sessions on your website or app.
E.g. “Three thousand visitors came to my guest house website multiple times last month; I had more than 5,000 sessions!”

. Users/Visitors >* The total number of people who have come to your website or app.
E.g. “My guest house website had 3,000 visitors last month!”

Common dimensions

. Browser > The program used by a visitor to navigate the internet. Examples include Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari.
E.g. “I can use web analytics tools to see how many people are viewing my site on the Chrome or Firefox browsers.”

. Campaign > The specific marketing effort that drove a user to your website.
E.g. “Creating campaigns around keywords related to King Arthur has boosted my business.”

. Device type > The category of device being used by visitors, such as laptop, tablet or smartphone.
E.g. “My analytics tool shows me which device type people use to view my website—tablets are especially popular.”

. Exit page > The last page a user views before they leave your website.
E.g. “Analytics tells me my most frequent exit page is the one with the welcome video, so maybe it’s taking too long to load.”

. Keyword > The specific term a user searched for before they reached your website.
E.g. “The keywords ‘luxury romantic getaway’ are driving a lot of people to my site.”

. Landing page > The first page that a user views when they reach your website.
E.g. “People have started calling my guest house more frequently since I included the phone number on my landing page.”

. Language > The language settings of the user’s browser.
E.g. “A growing percentage of my website visitors have French as their browser’s default Language.”

. Location > The geographic region of the user. It’s possible to get location information down to city level.
E.g. “People in Northern England gravitate to my King Arthur room page, while people in Southern England seem more interested in the Modern Romance room.”

. Operating system > The operating system of the device that a visitor is using. Examples include Windows, Android and iOS.
E.g. “People using the iOS operating system seem to spend more time browsing my site.”

. Page > The specific page a user is viewing, often referred to by its URL.
E.g. “The most popular page on my website is the King Arthur room page.”

. Traffic source > The specific place that referred the user to your website, such as a search Engine or a social network. Many analytics tools, such as Google Analytics, allow for very detailed breakdowns of traffic sources.
E.g. “The top traffic source for my site yesterday was Twitter—my football video blog must have gone viral!”

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